firehouselight:

*kneels at bedside* Dear Lord, thank you for Mommy and Daddy, and please don’t let anyone tweet explicit Newt/Hermann to Burn Gorman. Amen.

don’t do it!
filed under: #burn gorman   

hugsfrompeeta:

I really hope no one shares with Burn some of the Hermann/Newt #nsfw art. Please. Do. Not. folks.

yeah! really guys don’t scare the babe =x
filed under: #burn gorman   

killerweasel:

*flaily hands*

are you even real?
filed under: #burn gorman   

ministryofsillyhats:

Burn Gorman’s twitter: a summary

UURGH SO CUUTEE!
filed under: #burn gorman   

gatisss:

fromrheims:

Assemble by Blule

H

filed under: #marvel   #the avengers   
filed under: #Favorite   

feriowind:

celestialdeth:

thearseman:

OMG GUYS! BURN JUST MADE A TWITTERR KASMLDSAKDMSALDKSADM

GO FOLLOW THE SHIT OUT OF HIM
https://twitter.com/burngorman

AWAY FROM ME TEMPTRESS

ohmygod is he literally replying thanks to EVERYONE???

HE’S A BAAABEEE

schrodingersowen:

jesus christ burn

OOOOHHHH NO HE DIDN’T
filed under: #NO YOU DIDN'T   #burn gorman   

schrodingersowen:

burN goRMAn rePLIEd to mE on twITTER

filed under: #ehiueheiouehoiehje   

krazykitsune:

art-of-swords:

Handmade Swords - Earil

  • By Peter Lyon of Weta Workshop
  • Edition Size: 1
  • Measurements: Blade length: 915mm (36”). Overall length: 1217mm (48”). Weight: 1.94Kg (4 pounds 4 ounces). Balance point: 71mm (2.8”) along blade, measured from the shoulder of the blade

The sword has been made especially for the Weta Cave and Weta’s Online Shop to sell to the public. It is similar to late medieval European longswords, but with design flourishes transform it into a piece of art as well. A longsword is light enough and balanced to be used with one hand, but it can also be used two handed for powerful cutting blows. The blade is broad for much of its length, making for strong cuts, but comes to an acute point for effective thrusts, making this a true cut-and-thrust sword.

The individual parts have shapes and detail lines that blend into each other and continue into the next component, so that shapes continue even as the materials change, and the shapes of all the hilt parts draw the eye towards the diamond shaped bosses in the centre of the grip, filled with polished Paua (New Zealand abalone) shell each side. At the same time there is a strong central line through the hilt and along the blade, emphasising the straight and symmetrical shapes of the sword.

This sword has many nautical features which led me to the name, “Aearil”, which in Elvish means “Gleaming Ocean”. 

The straight blade is ground from spring steel bar, and has been heat treated to give the best possible combination of toughness and edge hardness. Historically blades were forged into shape and to remove flaws in the steel, but the consistency and high specifications of modern steels mean this is no longer necessary.

The bevelled edge is blunted for safety and display, but could just as easily be sharpened for cutting tests. The tang of the blade is strong and wide, and passes through the cross guard, grip and pommel, and is peened over the end of the pommel for maximum strength.

The cross guard is cut from a block of mild steel. From the centre block it projects along the blade and towards the ends, which are split into a fork. This is an unusual feature which I don’t recall being used on a sword before. The cross is set onto the shoulders of the blade for extra strength and stability, as was done on medieval European swords to prevent the cross becoming loose and rattling through use.

The grip is made of beech wood, covered with leather. Thin cords under the leather create the designs, and the leather has been carefully tooled to fit into all the shapes created by the cords. The grip was mostly drilled out then fitted by heating the tang and burning out the remaining wood for a tight fit, and finally glued in place. It is a two handed grip; the foregrip is straight to give a strong gripping surface, while the waisted shape of the upper grip encourages the second hand to nestle into the inside curves of the pommel.

The mild steel pommel is also a counterweight for the blade. It is shaped somewhat like a fish tail, with curved and recessed faces to add interesting shapes, and also to remove weight and get the best possible balance for the sword overall. The pommel was set tight onto the tapering tang before the end was peened over.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Weta Ltd.

image

filed under: #sword   #Favorite   

OMG GUYS! BURN JUST MADE A TWITTERR KASMLDSAKDMSALDKSADM

GO FOLLOW THE SHIT OUT OF HIM
https://twitter.com/burngorman

filed under: #burn gorman   #GO GO GO GO GO   #owen harper   #torchwood   #turn   
@theme